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U.S. Cybersecurity Contacts  

 
Report Child Sexual Exploitation
Report Cyberbullying
Report Cyberstalking
Report Identity Theft
Address Financial Fraud
Report Online Shopping Fraud
Report Problems with Online Auctions and Retailers
Report Problems on Social Media Sites
Report Data Breaches, Identity Theft, or Financial Fraud
Report Intellectual Property Crime
Report an International Scam
Report a Computer Security Iincident with No Financial Fraud
Address Device Problems

McAfee provides the following U.S.-based resources to assist with different forms of online crime.

 

Report Child Sexual Exploitation

  1. If your child is in immediate danger, call 911 or contact your local police (If you do not have their phone number, please call 411.) and the nearest FBI field office.
  2. If you would like more information or assistance in reporting, call the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children CyberTipline at 1-800-843-5678 or visit www.cybertipline.com.
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Report Cyberbullying

If you feel you are in physical danger, or the stalker knows where you live, call 911 immediately or contact your local police and the nearest FBI field office.

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Report Cyberstalking

After stopping correspondence, blocking the offender from all communications, and contacting the offender’s ISP, you can still choose to report the offense to your local police department.

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Report Identity Theft

The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) defines as “identity theft” as when someone uses your personally identifying information, like your name, Social Security number, or credit card number, without your permission, to commit fraud or other crimes. There are important steps that you can take if your identity has been stolen.

  1. File a report with the Internet Crime Complaint Center.
  2. File a complaint with the FTC.
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Address Financial Fraud

If you suspect that you are a victim of a cybercrime that has resulted in financial fraud, it is important to act quickly. The Federal Trade Commission recommends that you take the following five steps to resolve the problem:

  1. Place a fraud alert on your credit report. Fraud alerts tell creditors to follow certain procedures — such as contacting you first — before they open a new account in your name. If someone has your identity and/or account information, a fraud alert will make it much more difficult for them to open accounts in your name because it will provide you with an opportunity to personally verify such activities. Placing an initial 90-day fraud alert can be done quickly and easily by calling any one of the three nationwide credit bureaus.

    Equifax: 1-800-525-6285
    Experian: 1-888-EXPERIAN (397-3742)
    TransUnion: 1-800-680-7289

    Placing a fraud alert also entitles you to a free copy of your credit report. Review the report carefully and look for any other incorrect or suspicious information, such as accounts you didn't open, unexplained charges on current accounts, or inquiries from companies you have not contacted personally. Please note that detailed checking account information does not appear on your credit report, so if you suspect that someone has tampered with your checking account or ATM card, you should immediately contact your financial institution. In addition, while a fraud alert will help avoid new unauthorized accounts from being opened in your name, it is not likely to catch unauthorized charges or changes to existing accounts, so it is important to contact your financial institutions directly, as described in step 2.

  2. Call your financial institution where you suspect an unauthorized account was opened and immediately close any account that has been tampered with or established fraudulently. To rectify the situation and immediately close any account that has been tampered with or established fraudulently, call your financial institution or any financial institution where you suspect an unauthorized account was opened in your name by someone else.

    Before you call, make sure you have a pen and paper handy so that you can take notes on the conversation, including the person you spoke with and any next steps. This record could be important in future correspondence with the financial institution and/or law enforcement. The Identity Theft Assistance Center offers a free worksheet that can help you document your conversations and follow-up actions.

    Before ending the conversation, ask that the financial institution(s) send you a written letter to verify that the fraud was reported and the appropriate accounts were closed and/or charges discharged. Please note that some financial institutions may ask you to sign an affidavit as part of their fraud investigation process. This is to protect them from dishonest fraud claims.

    Most large financial institutions have dedicated fraud departments that you can contact directly. We've provided numbers for some of the larger institutions here:

    Fraud Numbers for Major U.S. Banks
    Bancwest Corp. 1-800-488-BANK (2265)
    Bank of America Corp. 1-866-231-5147
    BB&T Corp. 1-800-476-4228 1-800-BANK-BBT (1-800-226-5228)
    Capital One Financial Corp.
    - Credit Card Customers
    1-800-955-7070
    Capital One Financial Corp.
    - Deposit Customers
    1-800-239-7054
    Citigroup 1-800-950-5114
    Citizens Financial Group, Inc. 1-888-300-4822
    Comerica Incorporated 1-877-881-8955
    HSBC North America Inc. 1-800-659-4774 x 4331
    Fifth Third Bankcorp 1-800-676-5869
    Harris Financial Corp. 1-888-340-2265
    J.P. Morgan Chase & Company
    - Credit Card Customers
    1-800-436-7927
    J.P. Morgan Chase & Company
    - Deposit Customers
    1-800-935-9935
    Keycorp 1-888-810-4191
    M&T Bank Corp. 1-800-724-2440
    National City Bank 1-888-622-4932
    Northern Trust Corp.    312-444-4648
    PNC Financial Services Group, Inc. 1-888-213-1143
    Regions Financial Corp. 1-800-734-4667
    Suntrust, Inc. 1-800-786-8787
    Taunus Corp. 1-212-250-2500
    TD Bank North, INC. 1-800-893-8554
    U.S. Bancorp 1-714-985-2440
    Wachovia Corp. 1-888-647-3648
    Wells Fargo & Company 1-866-867-5568
  3. Follow up on all telephone reports of fraud to your financial institution in writing.

    It is important to follow up on all telephone reports of fraud to your financial institution in writing. Send copies (not originals) of relevant documents, along with a summary of your discussion and next steps via certified mail (with a return receipt requested), so that you can document the fact that the company received your correspondence. Keep all your notes on conversations and originals of any related written correspondence you receive from the credit bureaus, financial institutions, and/or creditors in a file. You should hold onto this file even after you believe your case has been resolved in case any future problems arise.
  4. Protect yourself from future fraud by changing your account passwords and PIN numbers. Avoid using easily attained information such as your dog’s name, your mother’s maiden name, or the last four digits of your Social Security number for your password, or other information that could be gleaned from Facebook or other public accounts.
  5. Report the fraud to your local police authorities.

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Report Online Shopping Fraud

If you have problems during a transaction, try to work them out directly with the seller, buyer, or site operator. If that doesn't work, file a complaint with:

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Report Problems with Online Auctions and Retailers

If you have problems during a transaction, try to work them out directly with the seller, buyer, or site operator. If that doesn't work, file a complaint with:

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Report Problems on Social Media Sites

Because threats to users of social media sites are growing at a swift pace, it is strongly recommended that you consult the customer service and security policies on each social media site to ensure that you are aware of the very latest hoaxes, security and privacy issues, and fixes.

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Report Data Breaches, Identity Theft, or Financial Fraud

  1. File a report with the Internet Crime Complaint Center (IC3) and to your local FBI office.
  2. File a complaint with the Federal Trade Commission.
  3. Contact your State Attorneys General.
  4. Contact your State Office of Privacy Protection for guidelines on database breach protection laws if your information could have been or has been compromised. If you do not know how to reach your State Privacy Office, contact the National Association of Attorneys General or the National Association of State Chief Information Officers to find contacts for your state.

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Report Intellectual Property Crime

  1. Report intellectual property crime through the Department of Justice.
  2. Follow the Department of Justice's Guidelines for Reporting Copyright Infringement or Trademark Violations.
  3. Follow the Department of Justice's Guidelines for Reporting Theft of Trade Secrets.

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Report an International Scam

Common cross-border e-commerce complaints include online shopping, international lotteries and auctions, and foreign money offers. To report an international (sometimes called cross-border) scam:

  1. File a complaint at EConsumer.gov. This is a joint project of consumer protection agencies from 26 nations, and is focused on ending international scams.
  2. If you've been involved in a foreign money offer scheme, contact your local Secret Service Field Office.

Note: Your complaint may not necessarily be investigated by a specific country, so you must work to find resolution yourself. Econsumer.gov has information about resolving the complaint without legal action, such as using an escrow service, reversing a charge payment, and locating a third-party dispute resource.

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Report a Computer Security Incident (No Financial Fraud)

More than a nuisance, hacking, viruses, spyware, phishing scams, and spam can lead to identity theft and other serious crimes. You can help stop cybercrime by reporting the incident to local authorities. While you may not get a personal response to your report, you are doing your part to fight cybercrime by giving law enforcement the information they need to deter and catch online criminals. Below are some suggestions of what to do when you become a target.

  1. Notify your Internet Service Provider (ISP) of the breach and file a complaint with the FBI Internet Crime Complaint Center.
  2. If you discover your computer systems have spyware, report this via the FTC Consumer Complaint Form.
  3. If you receive spam or emails that are “phishing” for personal information, forward them to spam@uce.edu.
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Address Device Problems

If you have used the McAfee Cybercrime Scanner or otherwise know that your PC is infected and need to take immediate action:

  • Do not conduct any further transactions on your PC until you address the issue.
  • Visit our online portal of free and fee-based service options to remove known problems, or take one of these actions:
    • Run other malicious software removal programs to remove the offending programs as soon as possible.
    • Visit your local electronics retailer which typically has onsite resources offering fee-based services for removing malicious programs.
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